Intel C++ Compiler Serial Key

Contents

  • Step 1: If you have an Existing Intel Fortran Installation If you already have a compatible version of the Intel compiler installed on your computer, you may not need to install Intel again. CRTech software will work with Intel® Visual Fortran Version 11.1.048 or newer, or Intel® Visual Fortran Composer XE for Fortran Windows.
  • Type 1 and press enter to begin the compiler installation. You will then be prompted to enter your Intel C Compiler for Linux serial number. The serial number was provided to you when you purchased the product, either in an e-mail from the reseller or on a sticker attached to the CD-ROM package.
  • Ispc is a compiler for a variant of the C programming language, with extensions for 'single program, multiple data' programming. Under the SPMD model, the programmer writes a program that generally appears to be a regular serial program, though the execution model is actually that a number of program instances execute in parallel on the hardware.

Introduction

The table below summarizes the key characteristics of LC's Linux commodity clusters. C and Fortran90 compilers (GNU, Intel, PGI) Testing software framework for hardware and operating system validation. Note that parallel compiler commands are actually LC scripts that ultimately invoke the corresponding serial compiler.

This document explains how to install and configure for use the Intel® C++ Compiler 9.0 for Linux* product. Installation is a multi-step process. Please read this document in its entirety before beginning and follow the steps in sequence. For information about the product contents, including new and changed features, please refer to the separate Release Notes.

If you have a previous (lower numbered) version of the Intel C++ Compiler for Linux installed, you do not need to uninstall it before installing this version. If you choose to uninstall the older version, you may do so before or after installing this version. If you have version 9.0 installed, you can choose to replace the existing install or install to an alternate location.

System Requirements

Supported Host and Target Combinations

The following list describes the supported combinations of compilation host (system on which you build the application) and application target (system on which the application runs).

IA-32 Host
Supported targets: IA-32 and Intel® EM64T
Intel® EM64T Host
Supported targets: IA-32 and Intel® EM64T
Intel® Itanium® Host
Supported target: Intel® Itanium®

Note: Development for a target different from the host may require optional library components to be installed from your Linux Distribution.

Requirements to develop IA-32 applications

  • A system based on an IA-32 processor (minimum 450 MHz Intel Pentium® II processor or greater - Intel Pentium® 4 or Pentium® D or Intel® Xeon™ processor recommended), or a system based on an Intel processor with Intel EM64T, or a system based on an AMD* Athlon* or AMD Opteron* processor
  • 128 MB (256MB recommended).
  • 100 MB of disk space, plus an additional 200 MB during installation for the download and temporary files.
  • Linux system with glibc 2.2.4, 2.2.5, 2.2.93, 2.3.2 or 2.3.3 and the 2.4.X or 2.6.X Linux kernel as represented by the following distributions. Note: Not all distributions listed are validated and not all distributions are listed.
    • Red Hat* Linux 7.3, 8, 9
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux* 2.1, 3, 4
    • SUSE* LINUX 8.2, 9.1
    • SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server* 8, 9
  • Linux Developer tools component installed, including gcc, g++ and related tools.

Requirements to Develop Applications for Systems with Intel EM64T or AMD Opteron Processors

  • A system based on an Intel processor with Intel EM64T or based on an AMD Opteron processor
  • 256 MB of RAM (512 MB recommended)
  • 300 MB free hard disk space, plus an additional 300 MB during installation for download and temporary files.
  • 100 MB of hard disk space for the virtual memory paging file. Be sure to use at least the minimum amount of virtual memory recommended for the installed distribution of Linux
  • Linux system with glibc 2.3.2 or 2.3.3 and the 2.4.X or 2.6.X Linux kernel as represented by the following Linux distributions, running in 64-bit mode. Note: Not all distributions listed are validated and not all distributions are listed.
    • Red Hat* Enterprise Linux 3, 4
    • SUSE* LINUX 9.1 Professional
    • SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9
  • Linux Developer tools component installed, including gcc 3.3.3, g++ and related tools.
  • 32-bit (IA-32) C and C++ runtime libraries: libm.so.6, libpthread.so.0, libc.so.6, libstdc++.so.5 and libgcc_s.so.1

Note: The requirement for the 32-bit (IA-32) libraries is due to the compiler and other tools being 32-bit applications that dynamically link to these libraries. If these libraries are not installed, the following error may be displayed when the compiler is invoked:

error while loading shared libraries: libstdc++.so.5: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

The error message is confusing as it does not indicate that the IA-32 version of libstdc++.so.5 is required. To avoid this problem, be sure that the 32-bit (IA-32) versions of these libraries are installed. Most, but not all, Linux distributions for Intel EM64T will install these by default.

Requirements to Develop Itanium-based Applications

  • A system based on an Intel® Itanium® 2 processor.
  • 512 MB (1GB recommended).
  • 150 MB of disk space, plus an additional 200 MB during installation for the download and temporary files.
  • Linux system with glibc 2.2.4, 2.2.5, 2.3.2 or 2.3.3 and the 2.4.X or 2.6.X Linux kernel as represented by the following distributions. Note: Not all distributions listed are validated and not all distributions are listed.
    • Red Hat Linux 7.2
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 2.1, 3, 4
    • SUSE LINUX Professional* 9.1
    • SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 8, 9
    • United Linux* 1.0
  • Linux Developer tools component installed, including gcc, g++ and related tools.

We recommend using binutils 2.14 or later, especially if using shared libraries as there are known issues with binutils 2.11.

We are unable to install on the unsupported configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 beta systems without 32-bit support in the kernel. If you encounter this limitation please contact Intel® Premier Support for a workaround.

Notes:

  • Compiling very large source files (several thousands of lines) using advanced optimizations such as -O3, -ipo and -openmp, may require substantially larger amounts of RAM.
  • The above lists of processor model names are not exhaustive - other processor models correctly supporting the same instruction set as those listed are expected to work. Please contact Intel® Premier Support if you have questions regarding a specific processor model
  • Some optimization options have restrictions regarding the processor type on which the application is run. Please see the documentation of these options for more information.

Obtaining the Compiler and Tools

Before installing the compiler and tools, you should check the File Downloads section of Intel® Premier Support to see if a newer version or update is available. The version on CD or as listed in your electronic download license letter may not be the most current. In order to download and install a compiler from Intel Premier Support, you will first have to register for support as described below in the topic Obtaining Technical Support.

Installing the Compiler and Tools

If you encounter difficulty with the initial installation or registration process, please visit https://registrationcenter.intel.com/support to request help from Intel.

Perform the following steps to install the compiler.

  1. Unpack the compiler package in a directory to which you have write access.
    > tar -xvf l_cc_p_9.0.xxx.tar
    or
    > tar -zxvf l_cc_p_9.0.xxx.tar.gz
  2. Run the installation script
    Execute the install script in the directory where the tar file was extracted.
    > cd l_cc_p_9.0.xxx
    > ./install.sh

  3. If you are not logged in as root, you will be asked if you want to install as root, install as root using sudo, or to install without root privileges. Installing as root (using sudo if you have that privilege) is recommended, as that will update the system RPM database. Select root, sudo or ignore - the last says to install as not root. Use the not-root install if you want to install to a private area.
  4. The install script will display a series of options. Numbered options (e.g. 1, 2, 3) are used to install specific components or tools. There may be some suboptions (e.g. 1a, 1b, etc.) which can be used to obtain additional information before installing. Type 1 and press enter to begin the compiler installation.
  5. You will then be prompted to enter your Intel C++ Compiler for Linux serial number. The serial number was provided to you when you purchased the product, either in an e-mail from the reseller or on a sticker attached to the CD-ROM package. You may also choose to enter a path to an existing license file. Make your selection and then follow the prompts.
  6. The install script then does some prerequisite checking and displays which Intel software development tools are installed, if any, and then offers a choice of a Typical Install or a Custom Install. Selection of a Typical Install is recommended - type 1 and press enter.
  7. Press enter again to display the license agreement. After the license agreement is displayed, you are prompted to accept or reject the license. If you accept the license, type accept and press enter. If you reject the license, type reject and press enter to end the install.
  8. The install will then continue - you may be prompted to accept further license agreements, specify install paths or to press enter to proceed through install steps.
  9. At the end of the installation, you will be prompted to register for Intel® Premier Support. Registration gives you full access to Intel Premier Support for the length of your support term (typically one year for licenses purchased with support), including all updates and new versions. Without registering, you will be unable to install or use product updates. Enter your e-mail address, when prompted, to register. (If you already have an Intel Premier Support account, enter its registered e-mail address.) You will then receive an e-mail with registration information including an initial password. If you do not wish to register, or if you have already registered, press x and press enter to exit.
  10. After registration, the install script exits.

Installation Warning for RPM 4.0.2 and RPM 4.1

RPM 4.0.2 cannot install to a non-default directory. This has been resolved in RPM 4.0.3. RPM 4.1 cannot install to a non-default directory. This has been resolved in RPM 4.11 to 4.2.

Eclipse* Installation Notes

Version 9.0 of the Intel C++ Compiler for IA-32 optionally installs the Eclipse* Integrated Development Environment (IDE) version 3.0.1 with C/C++ Development Tools (CDT) version 2.1.1, a Java* Runtime Environment (JRE) and the Intel C++ 9.0 compiler integration, which is required to use the Intel C++ Compiler within Eclipse. If you wish to use the Intel C++ compiler integration with your own instance of Eclipse, CDT and/or a JRE, you can. However, note that it is your responsibility to ensure that you are using the supported versions of Eclipse and CDT as well as a compatible JRE.

Intel C++ Compiler Serial Key 2020

To use your own version of the JRE (rather than the JRE supplied in the 9.0 Intel C++ compiler kit) with the other Eclipse components supplied in the kit, do the following:

  • Set the value of the variable OTHER_JVM_BINDIR to the full path of the folder of the java file from the JRE installed on your system. If you are using the bash shell, make sure that you export this environment variable.

To determine if a JRE is compatible with a particular version of Eclipse, refer to the website www.eclipse.org . There you will find references to JRE kits that are supported with a particular version of Eclipse, as well as links to websites where JRE kits can be downloaded. Note that Intel has only tested the JRE supplied in the Intel C++ compiler kit.

To use your own instances of Eclipse, CDT and a JRE, you will need to create appropriate files and folders so that the Intel C++ compiler integration gets plugged into your pre-installed Eclipse environment. If you want to use the <install-dir>/bin/iccec file ( <install-dir> is the location where the Intel C++ Compiler is installed), you will need to make the following changes in the iccec file:

  • Make sure that you have installed both the Intel C++ Compiler for 32-bit applications and the Plugins/Features for Integration into Eclipse* . When you choose Plugins/Features for Integration into Eclipse* , the Intel C++ Compiler features and plugins for integration into Eclipse* CDT development environment will be installed automatically. After the installation of these plugins and features, in the next screen, you can choose the option Integrate Intel(R) C++ Compiler Version 9.0 into Eclipse* installed at different location . You will be asked to provide the location where Eclipse is installed. Provide the location and exit the installation.
  • Set the value of the variable OTHER_JVM_BINDIR to the full path of the folder of the java file from the JRE installed on your system, as described above.
  • Set the value of the variable OTHER_ECLIPSE_BIN to the full path of the eclipse binary in the Eclipse installation folder. If you are using the bash shell, make sure that you export this environment variable. For example, if you have installed Eclipse in /opt/intel/eclipse, then OTHER_ECLIPSE_BIN should be set to /opt/intel/eclipse/eclipse. (Make sure that this file exists.)
You can then execute the iccec script and your chosen versions of Eclipse, CDT and a JRE will be used. If you get an error regarding the loading of libraries, make sure that you have set LD_LIBRARY_PATH to include the appropriate folder in which Eclipse is installed

Installing the Intel License Server

If you have a floating, counted or node-locked license, the license must be installed in conjunction with the FLEXlm* license server for Intel software (Intel License Server), which is available for many popular platforms. The server may be installed on any supported platform accessible on your local network. The compiler CD contains license servers for several Linux distributions. If you do not have the CD, or need a license server for an additional platform, you can find all available license servers in the File Downloads section of your Intel® Premier Support account - select product Intel SW Dev Tools License Servers to find the server for your platform.

Installing the Intel License Server on SGI* Altix* Systems Running SGI ProPack* 3

If you will be installing the Intel License Server on an SGI* Altix* system running SGI ProPack* 3, please follow these alternate instructions to ensure correct operation in the partitioned cluster environment:

  • Obtain the appropriate license server from Intel® Premier Support File Downloads at https://premier.intel.com/. On the File Downloads page, select product Intel SW Development License Servers. The file to use is flexlm.Linux.ia64.EL3_SGIAltix.tar.Z.

  • Install the license server following the instructions in the flexlm_ug.pdf documentation file in the compiler package.

  • To determine the host ID, required to retrieve the license file, log in to the partition from which the license server is to be run, set default (cd) to the directory where the Intel License Server is installed (default is /opt/intel/flexlm) and perform the following command:

    ./lmhostid

  • If you do not already have your license, go to the Intel Registration Center and register your product as described in the section above. If you already have a license with an incorrect host ID, submit an issue to Intel® Premier Support, providing the serial number of the license file, the results of running lmhostid, an indicator of whether this is a floating license or a node-locked license, and a request that a new license be generated for the new host ID. Be sure to specify that this is for an Altix system by selecting SGI* Altix* ProPack* 3.0 in the Linux* Operating System dropdown list. The Intel customer support team will generate a new license for you with the corrected host ID.

Setting Up the Compiler Environment

The programs in the Intel C++ Compiler 9.0 for Linux product rely on the environment variables PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH. The installation script (install.sh) creates compiler environment script files (iccvars.sh/idbvars.sh) that set these variables. It is strongly recommended that you add those script files into your login script (.login file). Once the variables are set in the '.login' file there is no need to run the script files for each session.

source the script to setup the compiler environment:

  • > source <install-dir>/bin/iccvars.sh(.csh)
    to use icc
  • > source <install-dir>/bin/idbvars.sh(.csh)
    to use idb

The installation program also creates compiler configuration files named <install-dir>/bin/icc.cfg that contain common settings for all compilations. You can edit these files to add additional default options. Note, if you install a compiler update package, you need to save the configuration file, if you have modified it, to another filename so that the installation doesn't overwrite your modified file.

If you have not already done so, please register for support after you install this product. See the topic Obtaining Technical Support below for registration instructions.

Uninstalling the Compiler and Tools

Please follow the steps below to uninstall the Intel Compiler and Debugger.

  1. If you installed as root, you will need to log in as root
  2. To uninstall the compiler:
    <compiler-install-dir>/bin/uninstall.sh
    or if you've installed the compiler to the default directory, use
    /opt/intel/cc/9.0/bin/uninstall.sh or
    /opt/intel/cce/9.0/bin/uninstall.sh on Intel EM64T-based systems
  3. To uninstall the debugger:
    <debugger-install-dir>/bin/uninstall.sh
    or if you've installed the debugger to the default directory, use
    /opt/intel/idb/9.0/bin/uninstall.sh or
    /opt/intel/idbe/9.0/bin/uninstall.sh on Intel EM64T-based systems

Obtaining Technical Support

Intel C++ Compiler Serial Key
Your feedback is very important to us. To receive technical support for the tools provided in this product and technical information including FAQ's and product updates, you need to be registered for an Intel® Premier Support account on our secure web site, https://premier.intel.com. Please register at https://registrationcenter.intel.com/ .
  • Registering for support varies for release products or pre-release products (alpha, beta, etc) - only released products have support web pages on http://support.intel.com/.
  • If you are having trouble registering or are unable to access your Intel® Premier Support account, please let Intel know of the problem at https://registrationcenter.intel.com/support.

Note: If your distributor provides technical support for this product, please contact them for support rather than Intel.

For information about the Intel C++ Compiler Users Forums, FAQ's, tips and tricks, and other support information, please visit: http://support.intel.com/support/performancetools/c/linux/. For general support information please visit http://www.intel.com/software/products/support/.

Disclaimer and Legal Information

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and Intel Corporation assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document or any software that may be provided in association with this document. This document and the software described in it are furnished under license and may only be used or copied in accordance with the terms of the license. No license, express or implied, by estoppel or otherwise, to any intellectual property rights is granted by this document. The information in this document is provided in connection with Intel products and should not be construed as a commitment by Intel Corporation.

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Intel C++ Compiler 10.1 Serial Number